Trigeminal Neuralgia Pain, Linked to MS, May Be Treated by New Compound

Treatment with a compound called BIIB074 shows promise in reducing pain caused by trigeminal neuralgia — a  condition that occasionally affects multiple sclerosis (MS) patients — with few side effects, a new clinical trial finds.

The Swiss study, “Safety and efficacy of a Nav1.7 selective sodium channel blocker in Titrigeminal neuralgia: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised withdrawal phase 2a trial,” appeared in the journal The Lancet Neurology.

Trigeminal neuralgia refers to sharp, acute pain in the teeth or face. It is caused by irritation of the trigeminal nerve, which stimulates the face, parts of the scalp and the oral cavity. Simple stimuli can irritate nerves, like touch, applying makeup, showering, talking, or even feeling a gust of wind.

Current treatment includes blockers of sodium channels such as carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine, but these drugs inhibit the channels whether they are active and causing pain or not, and for this reason have unwanted side effects.

The Phase 2a trial (NCT01540630), conducted

... read more at: https://multiplesclerosisnewstoday.com/news-posts/2017/02/22/prospect-for-more-effective-treatment-of-nerve-pain/

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